Ask the breeder

PRA crd3  |  Eye testing  |  PCDU  |  Skin problems  |  Popular sires

 

The Health issues pages discuss health concerns for the Glen ... and the section below has a list of health questions for prospective puppy buyers to discuss with breeders.

The two UK breed clubs' Codes of Ethics provide "best practice" guidance to breeders.

  • Glen of Imaal Terrier Enthusiasts & Fanciers Club (EFG) Code of Ethics

Please don't be afraid to ask about the health status of the dam and sire ... breeders should be only too happy to answer all your questions! 

 

You can download and print off this health checklist to discuss and complete with breeders about the brood bitch and stud dog.

Brindle Glen of Imaal Terrier with her wheaten pup being cuddled by breeder

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          

 

PRA crd3

PRA (progressive retinal atrophy) is a heritable condition that causes gradual loss of sight in dogs; and crd3 (cone rod dystrophy 3) is the Glen variant of PRA. A DNA test for crd3 has been available to breeders since 2010.

Ask the breeder:

 

What is the crd3 status of the dam and sire?

Responsible breeders will ensure that the crd3 status of both the sire and dam is known, and that at least one parent is either hereditary clear (HC) or DNA tested clear for crd3 to avoid the risk of any puppies developing crd3.

Health checklist  (page 2)

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          

 
 

 

Eye testing

Although we have had a DNA test for PRA crd3 since 2010, the UK breed clubs are in agreement that breeders should continue to regularly monitor their breeding stock for other hereditary ocular (eye) conditions.

Ask the breeder:

When were the dam and sire last eye tested?

Responsible breeders will ensure that both the dam and sire have an up-to-date eye test at the time of mating i.e. within the twelve months prior to mating ... if you pick up your puppy when s/he is 8 weeks old, the eye test should have been done within the previous 16 months.

If applicable, what were the results of the latest eye tests for the dam and sire?

The results should be "Unaffected".

Health checklist  (page 2)

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          

 

PCDU

Premature close of the distal ulna (PCDU) is a complex heritable condition. This is a painful condition that can affect one or both forelegs. The deformity at the wrist (carpus) leads to elbow incongruity (poor alignment of the joint surfaces in the elbow) and subsequent osteoarthritis. 

The UK breed clubs do not currently have any "best practice" guidelines for breeders ... as only a small number of cases have been reported ... but common-sense principles can be applied to try to minimise the risk of producing more Glens affected with this debilitating condition.

Ask the breeder: 

1. Has either the dam or sire been diagnosed with PCDU?

2. Does either the dam or sire have a history of persistent limping as a puppy?

3. Does either the dam or sire have excessive turnout of one or both front feet?

Responsible breeders should be able to answer “No” for each of the above questions because:

  • Breeders should not breed from Glens diagnosed with PCDU

  • A history of limping as a puppy, and excessive turnout of one or both front feet are consistent features of PCDU … in the absence of a diagnosis, breeders should not breed from Glens with these features

Health checklist  (page 3)

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          

 

 

Skin problems

The predisposition to develop skin problems, which are often associated with allergies, can be passed onto offspring. If either the sire or dam of a litter suffer with severe skin problems ... and especially if they require medication such as Apoquel or Cytopoint ... there is a possibility that their puppies may also go on to develop skin problems.

The UK breed clubs do not currently have any "best practice" guidelines for breeders ... but common-sense principles can be applied to try to minimise the risk of producing more Glens affected with these distressing issues.

Ask the breeder:

 

Does either the dam or sire suffer with skin problems?

Has either the dam or sire been prescribed medication such as Apoquel or Cytopoint?

Responsible breeders would not choose to breed from a Glen that has severe skin problems.

Health checklist  (page 4)

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          

 

 

Popular sires

The Kennel Club writes, “Popular sires, or male dogs that are used to produce large numbers of puppies, are one of the biggest contributors to a reduction in genetic diversity, an increase in inbreeding and elevated levels of genetic diseases within a breed."  The KC's population analysis, undertaken in 2015, revealed that "There appears to be extensive use of popular dogs as sires in Glens”

and this practice has, sadly, continued since then.

The EFG Code of Ethics recommends, “Dog not to produce more than six UK-bred litters over the course of his lifetime”.

Ask the breeder:

 

How many litters has the stud dog already sired?

  • Responsible stud dog owners will not allow their males to produce more than six litters

  • Responsible brood bitch owners will not allow their females to be mated to a male that has already produced six litters

You can view a spreadsheet of all the Glens who have produced litters since 2011 here.

Stud dogs are listed first, in alphabetical order. Males who have sired more than 6 litters are listed in red.

Health checklist  (page 4)